Why is Science important?

8/25 – We made it!

Woo-Hoo!  We made it through the first day everyone! Pat yourself on the back :)

HOME LEARNING:

(8th Grade)– please bring back your completed Interest Inventories and signed Curriculum Papers to class.

(7th Grade)– don’t forget your Signed Curriculum Papers and Safety Contracts (both copies)

8/23 – Welcome new students!

I’m looking forward to another awesome year teaching science at JLCP!  Once again I will be teaching both 7th and 8th grade science, so please make sure you’re reading the correct information for your class. I will make sure that I label the posts correctly :)

This week all of my students will be discussing the scientific process to open up the school year.  Students will be able to differentiate between quantitative and qualitative observations and gather empirical evidence.  There are a variety activities the students will complete this week to demonstrate understanding of the scientific process of gathering, recording and analyzing data.

Make sure you bring your spiral or composition notebook to class so we can set up our Interactive Science Notebooks.  See you all soon!

This week in science 8/23

image

This Week in Science

Ok… technically it’s last week in science, but it’s still pretty cool stuff!

this week in science

New Horizons Flyby and the NY Times Summer of Science!

The New Horizons flyby has already happened, but we won’t be getting all the data for quite some time.  It will take about 16 months for all the data to make the three billion mile trip back to Earth! We could cut that time down a bit (only 3 months) if New Horizons had exclusive use of NASA’s deep space network, but there are many probes that use it.

The New York Times has put together a collection of all it’s science articles called “The Summer of Science.”  Click the image below of Pluto to check it out!

The last and most detailed image of Pluto sent to Earth before the flyby. Credit NASA

The last and most detailed image of Pluto sent to Earth before the flyby. Credit NASA

IT’S PLUTO FLYBY DAY!!!!

Pluto's bright, mysterious "heart" is rotating into view, ready for its close-up on close approach, in this image taken by New Horizons on Sunday from a distance of 1.6 million miles (2.5 million kilometers). NASA / JHUAPL / SwRI

Pluto’s bright, mysterious “heart” is rotating into view, ready for its close-up on close approach, in this image taken by New Horizons on Sunday from a distance of 1.6 million miles (2.5 million kilometers). NASA / JHUAPL / SwRI

Today at 7:49 a.m. Nasa’s New Horizon’s probe will make its closest approach to Pluto!  This is a HUGE deal as the New Horizons mission launched way back in Jan. 2006 and we are learning more and more about the mysterious dwarf planet!

Nasa TV will start coverage at 7:30. Click the link to watch it!

Here’s an article about it from NBCNews.

Even Google is celebrating it with a very fitting google doodle!

google

Help save the world, one cheetah at a time

Mr. Geary:

My second cousin has started up her own blog about animals. She’s also running a campaign to help save some Cheetahs. Click below if you want to check it out!

Originally posted on Amazing Animals:

Cheetahs are very cute! (Photo: Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute) Cheetahs are very cute! (Photo: Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)

We can’t let the fastest land animal die out! A few bucks will save the world! If not, the cheetahs’ prey, gazelles and other plant eaters, will take over!!!!!

Please think about donating money to our National Geographic campaign to build a boma, a fence that keeps big cats out of African farmers’ cattle. When big cats get into farmers’ cattle, they often kill the big cats. This way we’re keeping big cats safe and helping the farmers, too.

View original

Happy 4th of July!

I hope everyone’s having an awesome 4th of July.  Here’s another cool science gem I found online:

“The chemistry of 4th July fireworks.

Sodium produces yellow/gold colors. Barium creates green, copper compounds produce blue, strontium salts give you red and titanium metals give you silver coloured sparks.

Other commonly used chemicals are carbon which provides the fuel, oxidizers which produce oxygen for burning, magnesium which increases the overall brilliance and brightness, antimony that gives you a “glitter” effect and calcium which deepens the colors.”

Image

The lost comet lander Philae woke up!

Good News Everyone — the Philae lander has finally woken up!

Click the image below to read more about it.

philae